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InformationVisitor Information:
STB 5 Star Historic Attraction.
Tel: 01835 822381.
Post Code: TD6 0RQ
Grid Ref: NT 591 316
www.historic-scotland.gov.uk
HS: Abbey Web Page
Opening Hours
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Dryburgh Abbey from the South
Dryburgh Abbey from the South

Dryburgh Abbey lies a few hundred yards north of the village of St Boswells. Yet its location, surrounded on three sides by a loop in the River Tweed, means that by road the journey is one of several miles. The sense of seclusion this brings is one of the great joys of Dryburgh Abbey. You can begin to gain some sense of what a life of contemplation might have been like for the monks who lived and worshipped here.

Exterior of the Chapter House
Exterior of the Chapter House
East Processional Door
East Processional Door
Novices' Day Room and South Range
Novices' Day Room and South Range
Rose Window in Refectory
Rose Window in Refectory
The Cloister from the South
The Cloister from the South
The Abbey from the South East
The Abbey from the South East

The second main attraction of Dryburgh is that so much of the domestic architecture remains visible. In a reversal of what has happened in other abbeys like nearby Melrose and Jedburgh it is possible to gain a sense of the day to day lives of the monks, while the Abbey Church itself has largely disappeared.

The Chapter House, perhaps the second most important space in the abbey, is especially well preserved. Above it you can still see parts of the dormitory, some of which was later converted into a house. The cloister retains its surrounding wall on three sides, while lower down the east range you can see the walls of the Warming House and parts of the Novices' Day Room. Even the Gatehouse, bridging the water channel to the south of the abbey, is partly standing.

Of the Abbey Church, only part of the North Transept gives any sense of the original structure. Here you find the chapels in and around which are buried Sir Walter Scott and Field Marshal Earl Haig, amongst others. For most of the rest of the church, you have to rely on foundations and imagination.

No physical trace has been found, but it is believed that the loop in the River Tweed occupied by Dryburgh Abbey was first settled by the early Christian missionary St Modan in around 600AD. Dryburgh Abbey itself dates back to 1150. Hugh de Moreville was the main landowner in the area. His family had come across from Normandy with William the Conqueror 84 years earlier, and he himself had befriended King David I of Scotland, eventually becoming Constable of Scotland (see our Historical Timeline).

Obelisk for Hugh de Moreville
Obelisk for Hugh de Moreville
The Chapter House
The Chapter House
Graves of Earl Haig and his Wife
Graves of Earl Haig and his Wife
Dryburgh Abbey Hotel
Dryburgh Abbey Hotel

There's a cynical view that during this period rich landowners endowed abbeys to make sure of a constant stream of prayer said on their behalf: and so to secure their place in the afterlife. Hugh de Moreville took a more personal role in his own salvation, becoming a novice at Dryburgh in his old age and dying there in 1162. Hugh de Moreville should not be confused with his son, also called Hugh, who helped murder Archbishop Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral in 1170.

The monks who settled at Dryburgh Abbey were Premonstratensians. This white robed order came originally from Laon in Northern France, though those at Dryburgh came from Alnwick Abbey. It is thought that work began on the abbey on 10 November 1150, and probably continued for most of the following century.

Dryburgh's location meant it inevitably became caught up in the wars between England and Scotland. In 1322 it is said that Edward II's army, retreating south to England, took exception to the sound of the bells of Dryburgh Abbey being rung to celebrate their defeat. They burned it down.

What emerged from a rebuilding process that probably took another 100 years was even bigger and better than before, despite further destruction by another English army in 1385. But the completed abbey of the 1400s would only see a further century of active use. The end effectively came on 4 November 1544 when some 700 English troops mounted a raid across the border, destroying both Dryburgh Abbey and the nearby town of Dryburgh.

Hot on the heels of the marauding English came the Reformation in 1560. At the time there were eight monks or canons still at the abbey, plus the sub-prior. They were allowed to live out their lives at Dryburgh, but all had died by 1600.

The remains of the abbey was acquired by the Earl of Buchan in 1786. He worked to preserve what was left, and built within and around it a large formal garden. Like many early antiquarians, he couldn't resist the temptation to improve the ruins. An inscribed date of 1150 owes more to him than to the original builders. He also built the obelisk to the south of the abbey, to commemorate its foundation by Hugh de Moreville.

The Presbytery, the East End of the Abbey Church
The Presbytery, the East End of the Abbey Church
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