Logo: small map of Scotland
Link to Area Info Page containing local information and links, contacts & tourist advice
Link to location map: launches popup window








The Kylesku Bridge in Evening Sunlight
The Kylesku Bridge in Evening Sunlight

Call it unfortunate timing, but the first edition of the wonderful "AA Illustrated Guide to Britain's Coasts" was published in 1984, and has a section on the Kylesku Ferry which, it notes, "has long saved motorists a 100 mile detour" via Lairg. To be fair, in the time honoured tradition of producers of written guide books trying to provide a bit of future-proofing, the book does make reference to the new bridge then due to replace the ferry.

The Kylesku Hotel
The Kylesku Hotel
Another View of the Kylesku Hotel
Another View of the Kylesku Hotel
The Newton Lodge Hotel
The Newton Lodge Hotel
The Statesman at Kylesku Pier
The Statesman at Kylesku Pier
The Maid of Glencoul in 1979
The Maid of Glencoul in 1979
The Maid of Kylesku
The Maid of Kylesku

A passenger ferry (a rowing boat) was introduced here in the early 1800s. Commercial traffic mainly comprised cattle on their way to central Scotland, and they had to swim across. Over the years various ferries came and went, and small car-carrying ferries first appeared between the wars. It was only in 1976 that the Maid of Glencoul, built in Ardrossan, became the first vessel capable of carrying fully loaded commercial vehicles. The Kylesku Ferry was unusual in being, for much of its life, free.

Kylesku Post Office and Quinag
Kylesku Post Office and Quinag
Fishing Boats at Kylesku
Fishing Boats at Kylesku
Fishing Boat and Mighty Quinag
Fishing Boat and Mighty Quinag
Bird Watching from the Ferry Slipway
Bird Watching from the Ferry Slipway
XIIth Submarine Flotilla Memorial
XIIth Submarine Flotilla Memorial

The bridge you see today was duly opened, in 1984, by the Queen. It must be one of the most beautiful examples of the bridge-builder's art anywhere in the world. It may only be 276m long, and may only cross a 130m stretch of water, but it is transformed into something very special by its wonderfully curved design, coupled with the stunning scenery of Sutherland.

And you have every chance to view the bridge, either from a car park on the northern side or from one at a lower level on the southern side. The latter gives an interesting insight into the way the bridge was constructed, plus views of its underside. The northern car park gives a better feel for the way the bridge fits into the wider scenery.

On the north side of the bridge is the plaque celebrating the opening. Also here, overlooking Quinag and Loch a' Chairn Bhain, is a cairn erected in 1993 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the formation of the XIIth Submarine Flotilla, a unit of "X-craft" and "Chariot" miniature submarines which trained in "these wild and beautiful waters" from 1943.

Kylesku itself stretches back along the road from the slipway that used to be the southern end of the ferry crossing. It is now by-passed by the main road heading for the bridge, but is well worth the detour of only a few hundred yards. At the end of the village overlooking the old ferry slipway you find the attractive Kylesku Hotel, which offers outstanding food, excellent service and comfortable accommodation. When the wind is still, Kylesku must be one of the most silent places you are ever likely to encounter, and whatever the weather it is an ideal place to catch breath and slow down, even if only briefly.

There are also opportunities from here to take boat trips on the locally based Statesman to view the 650ft high Eas-Coul-Aulin waterfall, Britain's highest, and four times the height of the Niagara Falls.

Kylesku is also home to a jetty for locally-based fishing boats, and forlorn and grounded on the opposite side of the bay lies the Maid of Kylesku, see photo, left. This two car ferry was built for the Kylesku crossing in the early 1950s, where it served until replaced by the Queen of Kylesku in 1967. This in turn was replaced by the Maid of Glencoul, shown at Kylesku on the left.

When no longer needed, the Maid of Kylesku was simply beached and abandoned where you can still see her today. The Maid of Glencoul was better treated. After the opening of the Kylesku Bridge she went on to serve as the Corran Ferry, where she remains as a relief vessel. (Our thanks to John MacLeod for the background on the Kylesku Ferries.)

The Kylesku Bridge in Snow
The Kylesku Bridge in Snow
Top of Page Top of Page