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InformationVisitor Information:
Suilven is 2,389ft or 731m high.
The route described here is some 15 miles or 25km long in total.
Grid Ref: NC 153 184
Suilven From the South
Suilven From the South

What's the best mountain in Scotland? Let's all be glad that tastes differ, but for us the best mountain in Scotland has to be Suilven. A "mere" 2,389ft high with a name said to come from the Norse "Pillar Mountain": which shows, not surprisingly, that the Vikings saw its seaward profile first.

Suilven from Lochinver
Suilven from Lochinver
Close-up of that Improbable Summit
Close-up of that Improbable Summit
The Reverse View
The Reverse View
Top Reflecting Cairn
Top Reflecting Cairn
Distant View from the South West
Distant View from the South West
Seen Over Loch Inver
Seen Over Loch Inver

When viewed from Lochinver, Suilven looks magnificent and impossible: a policeman's helmet of rock. When viewed from the main Ullapool road to the east, it appears spiky, like something out of Tolkien. From the north or south, however, Suilven shows itself to be a long bumpy ridge, with a noticeable waist somewhere near the middle. This is the key to any ascent.

There are several ways of approaching Suilven. But first a word of warning. This is not a high mountain, and the climbing is relatively straightforward. But it is a remote lump of rock carefully placed in the middle of a lochan-strewn wilderness that stretches for many miles in every direction. Don't for a moment think you're in for an easy day out.

Viewed from the South
Viewed from the South
Summer View from the North West
Summer View from the North West
Viewed from the North West
And in Winter...
Suilven from the East
Suilven from the East
And in Summer...
And in Summer...
Caisteal Liath from Meall Meadhonach
Caisteal Liath from Meall Meadhonach
(Image Courtesy Clive Griffiths)

Probably the most popular route to Suilven starts a mile or so outside Lochinver on a minor road leading to Glencanisp Lodge. There are a few parking places at the point the road becomes a private drive. The only alternative is the walk in from Lochinver.

From here the path goes through the grounds of Glencanisp Lodge: follow the signs taking you to the left around the back of the house. Once clear of the grounds you embark on a lovely undulating walk along a superb stalkers' path. You stay on this for four or five miles, watching Suilven's shape steadily change from end-on to side-on.

After you feel sure you must have gone too far along the path, you finally come across the cairn that marks the spot at which you need to strike out reasonably directly towards the low point of the ridge, now slightly west of south of you. If the stalkers' path was too civilised for your taste, you will probably enjoy the boggy morass you must now traverse to the foot of the gully leading up to the ridge.

This is a hard pull in anyone's language, and the erosion in the gully has become noticeable worse over the years. But you gain height quickly, and the views north, to Quinag and beyond, open out nicely.

Gaining the ridge reveals views south taking in Stac Polliadh that are every bit as good as those you've been admiring to the north. Once on the ridge you simply turn right, make your way through a gap in a magnificent and magnificently pointless dry stone wall built across the line of the ridge, and after some minor scrambling, make your way up to Caisteal Liath, the higher western summit of Suilven.

You know you've arrived when you see, on our last visit at least, a cairn which, to borrow Muriel Gray's joke, must have received an Arts Council grant. Otherwise the summit is a surprise, feeling like a gently sloping grass field perched on top of the world. It would be going a little far to suggest you could hold a football match on top (fetching the ball after a goal would rapidly lose its novelty) but it's certainly not what you expect to find on top of the fearsome-looking Pillar Mountain.

The eastern end of Suilven's ridge, Meall Meadhonach, is narrower and peakier, but fortunately lower, as gaining it requires some scrambling skill and a good head for heights. The top is, we are told, as flat as a billiard table, and given the awkwardness of reaching it we are happy to take this on trust!

So then it's back down the eroded gully and across the peaty moor before finishing the day with the trek back to your car or the longer one to Lochinver, whichever comes first. Magnificent views and a wonderful - if quite long - day out on the best mountain in Scotland.

The alternative approach to Suilven is from the south, starting at a car park south of Inverkirkaig which gives access to a path leading to the Falls of Kirkaig: and past them to Fionn Loch, and Suilven beyond.

Looking East from Caisteal Liath to Meall Meadhonach
Looking East from Caisteal Liath to Meall Meadhonach
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