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Grid Ref: NN 161 887
Mile Dorcha, or Dark Mile
Mile Dorcha, or Dark Mile

Loch Arkaig is another of the many east-west lochs the glaciers scoured across the Western Highlands. Near its eastern end is the hamlet of Achnacarry, at its western end is the even smaller settlement of Strathan. Between them lies the narrow road that makes its way for 13 miles along Loch Arkaig's northern shore.

Approaching Loch Arkaig
Approaching Loch Arkaig
Loch Arkaig Looking West
Loch Arkaig Looking West
Mossy Wall in the "Dark Mile"
Mossy Wall in the "Dark Mile"

The gateway to Loch Arkaig, symbolically at least, is the Commando Memorial, just off the A82 a mile or so north of Spean Bridge. The memorial commemorates the use made of the area, and Loch Arkaig in particular, as a training ground by the commandos 1942 and 1945.

From its junction with the A82, the B8004 goes downhill to Gairlochy, close to the southern tip of Loch Lochy, and then crosses the Caledonian Canal (and the line of the Great Glen Way) at a lock. On the far side of the valley you join the road coming up from Corpach, now single track, and then twist your way north alongside the lower part of Loch Lochy.

Commando Memorial
Commando Memorial
Eas Chia-aig  Waterfalls
Eas Chia-aig Waterfalls

Keep a lookout for signs to Achnacarry and the Clan Cameron Museum on your left. The museum sits opposite Achnacarry Castle, the Clan seat of the Camerons, and base for the commandos during WWII.

A little further, at Clunes, the road takes a sharp left turn away from Loch Lochy and heads through the Mile Dorcha, or Dark Mile towards Loch Arkaig itself. This is a deeply wooded section of road in a valley, flanked by walls carrying a tremendous thickness of moss. At its far end is the parking area for the Eas Chia-aig: spectacular waterfalls cascading down the north side of the valley and well worth exploring.

Beyond the waterfalls the road straightens before emerging at the end of Loch Arkaig itself. It is less known or visited than otherwise similar lochs like Mullardoch or Monar, or its northern neighbour Loch Quoich. The reason is fairly simply: though Loch Arkaig is surrounded by mountains, only one breaks the 3000ft barrier, and that is most easily climbed from elsewhere.

Apart from its wildness and innate beauty, there is one other reason why you might want to reach the western end of Loch Arkaig. Surprising though it may seem until you look at a map, it is one of the best ways of walking into Knoydart.

The only easy way into Knoydart is by boat to Inverie. And the most popular route on foot is from the road end at Kinloch Hourn along Loch Hourn to Barrisdale Bay. But from Strathan, just beyond the end of Loch Arkaig, a track leads up Glen Dessary, eventually emerging at the wild and very lonely eastern end of Loch Nevis.

Loch Arkaig's other claim to fame is as the alleged hiding place of a consignment of gold landed by the French at Arisaig for the Jacobites in 1746. This was hidden somewhere near Loch Arkaig, and the hiding place, it is said, has never been found.

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